Appeal to national federations for trainers` title applications - deadline extended to 1 June Print
Monday, 14 February 2005 00:00
National Federations are requested to submit applications for the titles of trainers’ award. The year 2005, the 10th anniversary of the Trainers Committee, shall be dedicated towards this aim to certify trainers’ titles. For this purpose, applications will have to be received by June. FIDE Development Commission Chairman Ignatius Leong appeals to all national federations and trainers to participate to help make this developmental project move on with a brighter future.

FIDE Trainers Committee reminds all National Federations to submit applications for Trainers` Titles before 1st June 2005. Such applications received shall be exempted from taking the examination at seminar for the initial 4 years.

Please send all applications to GM Yuri Razuvaev email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it > This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it with copy to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it > This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it with the relevant information as per regulations.

Download Appeal letter of FIDE Development Commission Chairman Ignatius Leong

Appeal to Chess Trainers,
All National Chess Federations

Re: FIDE TRAINERS COMMITTEE (1995 – 2005)

The Trainers Committee was formed at the Paris Congress in 1995. For several years, the Trainers Committee has been trying to define its roles and programmes but, unfortunately, the world chess community paid scant support to its importance in the development of chess.

At the Istanbul Congress in 2000, the highly respectable Russian trainer GM Yuri Razuvaev was elected to chair the Committee. He brought with him numerous years of experience as a trainer from the famous Soviet School of Chess era. GM Razuvaev enlarged membership on the Committee and started working towards collection of material to compile training manuals for FIDE. FIDE also instituted the titles of FIDE Trainer and FIDE Instructor but there were hardly any interested applications from the professional and serious minded trainers. At that time, there was also a seemed overlap in the functions of the Trainers Committee and the Committee for Chess in Schools but this was amicably resolved between the two chairmen and committees.

On my several visits to China, I was taken to schools and kindergartens and I was amazed when I saw so many young children play the game. I was also impressed when I visited the Chess School of GM Utut Adianto. I then tried to copy and incorporate some good practices into the teaching methods of my several trainers whom my company (Intchess Asia – founded in 1996) hires. We worked on and compiled a training syllabus well over 200 lessons starting from an absolute beginner to reaching about 1500. We are constantly updating and improving the lesson contents. Such a systematic approach has yielded desirable results so far, and thus it is important for National associations to support the very process that recognizes good practices and approaches to training.

I founded the Asean Chess Academy in 2003. We have since organized two seminars (IM Nikola Karaklaic and FST Israel Gelfer) for Trainers and one seminar (IA Stewart Reuben) for Arbiters. By the end of February 2005, the Academy will have a teaching strength of 31 Trainers – Armenia (2), Georgia (2), Hungary (1), India (1), Kazakhstan (1), Philippines (7), Romania (1), Russia (8), Singapore (3), Turkmenistan (2), Uzbekistan (1) and Vietnam (2). The Trainers are assigned according to their strength (not playing-level) of instruction to children and youth and national players. The Academy trains the national squads of Singapore, instructs more than 100 schools, giving private chess-tuition to more than 100 players and conduct more than 50 elementary groups at the Academy which has 12 training rooms and is facing problems with limited space available. Since last year, Vietnam has sent three of their best juniors to train (and receive normal academic education) in Singapore. The Academy will also assist to conduct training seminars in Korea, Chinese Taipei and other countries in the region. However, the Academy cannot do this by itself. It needs other federations to do likewise in order for the training standards worldwide to improve.

I believe that chess can be taught to children at their very young age and that such instructors need to be trained to do the job well. It is like education where even teachers have to be trained in their job to teach. And like in education, there are various levels – elementary, high school, college, university etc. Like in most sports, trainers/coaches have to be accredited in the form of certification or licensing. Periodical upgrading of the trainers’ teaching skills are equally important to those being taught. Sports with such development and certification programmes for coaches are perceived to be more serious and professional.

At the Calvia Congress 2004, the Trainers Committee chose and approved my proposals to revamp the award of training titles – these have been expanded on and described in the article by IM Jovan Petronic. The titles give recognition and may also be useful to the trainers when their employers determine their salaries for training jobs. When an employer has to choose between two applicants with very much similar credentials and experience (everything being equal), then a FIDE license could make the difference.

I have also prepared another proposal to award trainers who have performed well and whose students excel in regional, continental and world-level competitions. In today’s sporting world, the players benefit from prize money but not their trainers. Without going into the details of my proposal, the general principle is that trainers with successful results should also be rewarded with cash incentives. However, for those who fall in this category, these trainers have to believe and be part of the system – that is they have to be accredited with a FIDE license.

Much work needs to be done. We are only at the beginning of a new era – Chess Training. This is a major task, which FIDE cannot do alone. GM Razuvaev has been labouring to reach out for more assistance and co-operation. The programme needs the support of all national chess federations and more importantly, the chess trainers, whether professional, amateur, full time, part time, or even volunteers. I believe that chess training will be the live wire of FIDE. It is where most of our players will benefit from – as a regular source of income. Appearance fees are only for the elite few, prize money is for those who win. There is not so much money earned through writing.

GM Razuvaev and his colleagues have written to request national federations to submit application for the titles of trainers’ award. 2005, the 10th anniversary of the Trainers Committee, shall be dedicated towards this aim to certify trainers’ titles. For this purpose, applications will have to be received by May, shall be exempt from having to pass written examinations.

I appeal to all national federations and trainers to participate to help make this developmental project move on with a brighter future.


Yours sincerely
Ignatius Leong
Chairman, FIDE Development Commission
14th February 2005

 
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