Moscow Open 2014 Concluded Print
Tuesday, 11 February 2014 12:46
The massive Moscow Open 2014, International RSSU Cup with more than 1700 participants was held from Jan 30th to Feb 9th in auditoriums on the Russian State Social University campus.

FIDE President Mr. Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, Secretary of FIDE Events Commission Mr. Theodoros Tsorbatzoglou, Vice-Chairman of the Department of Physical Culture and Sport of Moscow Mr. Alexey Pyzhov, Rector-founder of the RSSU Mr. Vasily Zhukov and President of Moscow Chess Federation Mr. Vladimir Palikhata took the place in the awarding ceremony of the winners and prize-winners that was held in the evening of Feb 9 in the RSSU assembly hall.

Official website / Games with analysis / Photo gallery


Moscow Open 2014


Four grandmasters have shown the best results at the Moscow Open 2014, Men’s Premier Cup: Alexander Moiseenko (Ukraine), Maxim Matlakov (Russia), Mateusz Bartel and Michal Krasenkow (both from Poland) earned 7 of 9 possible points.

The current European Champion Moiseenko and one of the strongest chess players of St. Petersburg Matlakov are favored by the tie- break rules. In fact, all three of the tie-breaking criteria are equal. As a result both grandmasters became the winners of the tournament.

Mateusz Bartel became the bronze medalist. Michal Krasenkow is at the fourth place. 16 participants finished with 6.5 points.

Olga Girya won the first place at the Moscow Open 2014, Russian Women’s Premier Cup. She managed to win the games in the last two rounds. The Russian chess player gained 7.5 of 9 possible points.

Seven chess players are half a point behind her. Tie-break rules placed Daria Charochkina second and Baira Kovanova third (both players representing Russia).

Alina Kashlinskaya, Anastasia Bodnaruk (both representing Russia), Ekaterina Atalik (Turkey), Ekaterina Semenova (Russia) and Nino Batsiashvili (Georgia) are behind the prize winners’ line. The players are placed in this succession in the final chart according to tie-break rules.

Junior Champion of Russia, 15-year old Vladislav Artemiev from Omsk became a winner of the Men’s Student Grandmaster Cup. These competitions were held according to the round-robin system with the participation of 10 chess players. The young player lost only one point in nine rounds. He has a two-point lead over silver medalist Muscovite Andrey Stukopin.

The third place is taken by another representative of Moscow Vladimir Belous. He also gained 6 points but the tie-break rules placed him in fourth place.

Meri Arabidze (Georgia) is the winner of the Women’s Student Grandmaster Cup. She has 6.5 points and a half point lead over Nafisa Muminova (Uzbekistan), who became the silver medalist. Elizaveta Soloviova (Ukraine) won bronze. Having 5.5 points she beat Wang Jue (China) on tie-break rules.

The famous muscovite Grandmaster Yuri Balashov takes gold in the Senior Tournament. Having 7.5 points he beat International Master Evgenij Kalegin, with the same number of points, on tie-break rules.

Four participants earned half a point less. The tie-break rules provided Arkadi Vul (Moscow) with the bronze medal. Poor results in tie-break criteria prevented famous Grandmaster Evgeny Sveshnikov (Latvia), FIDE Masters Oleg Zilbert (Moscow) and Valentin Artyushikhin (Kostroma) from making the prize list. They all had 7 points.

17-year old candidate masters from Tula is the winner of the tournament with the highest number of participants – the RSSU Amateurs’ Cup. He lost only half a point in the nine rounds. Andrei Gurbanov (Belarus) with 8 points took second place. Pavel Toporov (Tatarstan) with 7.5 points is the third.

14 players are half a point behind the prize winners’ line. All of them have earned 7 points.



 
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